Autonomous Cars Are Coming, But Will Americans Accept Them

We all know that autonomous cars are the future of automobile transportation. In fact, we are already seeing some limited self-driving features on the road, the most famous, of course, being Tesla. But will Americans accept a fully autonomous vehicle? According to a new study by the American International Group, Inc (AIG), people are actually fairly divided on the issue.

The AIG study shows that about 41% of respondents say that the idea of sharing the road with autonomous cars makes them uncomfortable. While 42% of respondents said they have no problem sharing the road with a self-driving car.

Those who say that they are uncomfortable with self-driving cars list security as their primary concern. In fact, 75% of respondents said that despite features like emergency braking, lane departure etc. they are most concerned with autonomous cars being susceptible to a hacker’s attacks.

While someone hacking a self-driving car is alarming because of the physical danger it puts you in, people are equally alarmed about the potential privacy violations. Can a hacker obtain your private data? Credit card information? Your driving habits? These concerns will have to be addressed before autonomous cars are deployed en masse to public roadways.

The report is not all bad news, it also identified respondents perceived benefits of autonomous cars. 44% of respondents said that they were most excited about easier/less stressful transportation. 42% think self-driving cars will make the roads more safe, while 39% are most excited about lower insurance premiums.

The safety of self-driving cars is still in doubt, however, with 27% of respondents indicating that they don’t think autonomous vehicles will make the roads safer at all. In fact, 31% of respondents believe that they drive more safely than any autonomous vehicle.

The reality is that self-driving cars are the future of transportation in America. Unfortunately, there is still a lot of work to be done to convince the general public that this is a good thing. As the technology continues to improve, and more data is gathered, we can expect that to change. In the meantime, keep both hands on the wheel.

Sources:
http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2017/10/03/466351.htm